GEORGE’S HANDY GUIDE TO ELECTRONIFYING YOUR OLD HANDOUTS

This is your step-by-step guide to taking an old handout, scanning it in, and then creating a new document that you can rearrange and edit.

Take a nice copy of your original. Go to the hallway copier and poke E-MAIL.
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Tap the white box under “To:”. The keyboard appears. Sharpen your finger and push the tiny little letters to get your email address in.
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Punch the “More Options” button on the bottom and you’ll see this:
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You want to change the first three. Change Document File Type from ‘PDF’ to ‘TIFF’, Output Quality from ‘Medium’ to ‘High’, and Resolution from ‘150 dpi’ to ‘300 dpi’.
Put the pages of your document into the feeder and press the ‘Start’ button – just like you were making copies.
Go back to your desk.
Open your email. Go to the email (from ‘administrator’). You should find one file for each page you scanned. Save these to your computer by right-clicking on the file and selecting ‘Save as’. You won’t use these for long, so I suggest just putting them on the desktop.
- YOU’RE HALFWAY HOME –
Now you’ll need to open two programs. The one we’ll use to convert the scanned pages is called ‘Microsoft Office Document Imaging’. You get to it by going to Start→All Programs→Microsoft Office→Microsoft Office Tools→Microsoft Office Document Imaging. The other program to open is the one in which you’ll place the text – probably Word or OneNote.
You’ll be flipping from program to the other. A fast way to do this is by holding down the ‘Alt’ key and pressing the Tab key (up there by the ‘Q’).
In the Document Imaging program, open the scanned page you want to work with (just like you would with any document). Select the text or image you want to move by drawing a box around it. You should see a red line around your selection.
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You have two choices at this point. If you hit ‘control-C’, you’ll convert the scanned image to text (which will allow you to edit it and reformat it); if you hit ‘control-I’, you’ll copy the image exactly as it appears. Typically, you’ll use ‘control-C’ for text and ‘control-I’ for illustrations, graphs, and formulas.
Once you’ve chosen one of these two options, flip to the other program (with Alt-Tab) and paste (by hitting ‘control-V’). If you opted to convert to text, you’ll want to proofread carefully, sometimes the software does some crazy things with unusual characters.
After you’ve copied and converted what you want, you can save the Word or OneNote document and delete the scanned files. You’re in the club now!